5 Simple Ways To Save On Baby Stuff

This post is part of the Frugal Parenting series with Taya and Lori.

This guest post was written by Taya of Simply Frugal

For many soon-to-be and new parents, stressing out over how to afford a new baby is a given, especially in a shaky economy. But for many first-time parents, when it comes to actually buying things for their baby, many will spare no expense.

But, there are easy ways you can save hundreds, maybe thousands on your baby essentials. Here are 5 simple ways to save money on baby stuff:

1. Buy the smallest diapers possible.

Don’t be in a hurry to move up to the next size of diapers if you don’t have to. By buying bigger diapers you’re also getting less in a package.

For example, a package of size 3 Pampers Baby Dry (mega pack) has 60 diapers and fits babies that are 16 – 28lbs, while the size 4 has 52 diapers in the pack and fits babies that are 22 – 37lbs.

2. Buy in bulk.

By purchasing the items you use every day, such as diapers and wipes, in the biggest package possible you can definitely save money in the long run.

Not only will it save you money, but quite possibly, late night runs to the grocery/drug store!

3. Be patient.

When it comes to preparing for the arrival of a new baby, it’s very easy to think you have to have everything ready before the baby is born. However, if you wait to buy some items, you’ll discover what you really want, or need.

One thing you might think is essential: newborn sized clothing. Most babies can get away with wearing 0-3 month clothing, which will fit quite a bit longer anyway. The longer you wait to buy, the more informed you’ll be about where you want to spend money and where you’d like to save.

4. Talk to other moms.

When you talk to other moms who have “been there, done that”, you’ll find out what they found to be useful and what they didn’t.

Some moms find infant car seats to be a waste and just go straight for the convertible seat. Listen to their reasonings, then decide for yourself what will be best for you when it comes to all baby purchases.

5. Save with social networking.

Not only is it beneficial to sign up for manufacturer’s mailing lists, but joining your favourite brands’ Facebook pages and following them on Twitter could garner you good savings and free stuff.

Social networking sites are a great place to find coupons, giveaways and special offers for your favourite products.

Having a new baby is such a wonderful time, but there’s no need to spend all your hard earned dollars on baby stuff, when you’re armed with some frugal tricks!

In my opinion, saving money on the purchases you have to make is just as fun as spending money, especially when you know you’re making an informed purchase.

How do you save on baby stuff?

Taya enjoys the simple pleasures in life, deal hunting and being creative on a budget. She is also a new stay at home mom to a sweet little girl, living in beautiful British Columbia. With the help of her supportive husband Jesse, she writes daily on her website, Simply Frugal – which is dedicated to making the frugal lifestyle more simple for Canadians.

  • Subscribe to our email list to receive a FREE video outlining my top 5 tips for saving money on groceries.
  • Your e-mail address
Comments
  1. Marya says:

    Buy used (Kijiji, Facebook Mom’s groups, Mom-to Mom sale) – from clothes, to toys, to unopened packages of diapers. You can great great nearly new stuff and save a fortune!
    Talk to family/friends who have kids – borrow what you can – especially things that are only used for a short period of time (infant bathtub, exersaucer, jolly jumper, bouncy chair, toddler bed). Lend out your own items when you are done (that way you don’t have to store them until #2 comes).

  2. Katie says:

    Cloth Diapers! I know there is a little debate going on about the cost if you are washing diapers so often, but if you ask for them as a shower gift (I got 12 as a shower gift from my family and purchased 6 more myself @ $24.00 each) that eliminates all or most of the cost of the actual diapers… and with a baby you re doing laundry anyway and one load every day or two cannot amount to the cost of diapers- Plus, my son has NEVER had a diaper rash, so that also eliminates the cost of that… and I am not putting harsh chemicals on his skin from the creams and diapers themselves! In the summer you can also hang the diapers out to dry :)

  3. teachermum says:

    Do people not have showers any more before baby arrives? I didn’t really need to go out and buy anything! People knew I was going to cloth diaper and nurse so I got diapers (not the all in one expensive ones), pins, plastic pants, diaper bag, nursing pads, small breast pump, onsies in all sizes, baby towels, facecloths (didn’t use wipes), diaper pail, plenty of clothes to last several days between washings, as well as group gifts of a high chair, playpen and stroller. I was loaned an infant car seat, a bouncy chair and a baby bath. My mum bought me a jolly jumper just like the one I had as a baby-it had just come out then. I also got several baby toys. I got enough new boy clothes when ds came along (no shower) and we bought a double stroller. I also took any clothing handmedowns though it seemed every kid before mine was a skinny mini and mine wasn’t!

    That was plenty-you really don’t need all the “stuff” the stores advertise-so my “best way of saving” is to simply not buy it! I passed on everything we had to others down the line when we didn’t need it any more.

  4. Maggie says:

    I agree, you don’t need everything BabiesRUs says you do. We got one of those nursing pillows (never used it) an in-the-bed-sleeper thing (never used it), swaddling blankets (baby hated them) and a Bumbo which baby was too fat to sit in by the time they could hold up their head enough. And a “used” Bumbo will only get me around $25, now. My two “essentials” would be diapers, and lots of them, and a good infant seat that you can safely buckle baby into when you need to do something (like shower!). We have a Fisher-Price rocker chair that has been used and used and used, and the baby is 7 months and still using it daily. We borrowed a swing for a few months but baby didn’t love it, it took up a ton of space, and I’m SO GLAD we didn’t buy one.

  5. Katie says:

    I use cloth diaper and wash cloths for homemade wipes, which has help considerable in cutting cost. I have also bought most of my daughter’s things second hand including her cloth diapers, clothes, crib, bassinet (I got for 10 dollars then went to the store an saw them selling them for over 100). I also have a friend whose daughter is 4 months older than mine which I was able to borrow a baby swing, tub, and vibrating chair, as well as several clothes.

  6. RB says:

    Just wanted to say, be informed about putting a newborn in a convertable car seat. Many car seat educators will tell you that it isn’t the best option (even though its rated for 5lbs and up). I am not a car seat educator, but I thought about doing this with my second child and a good friend of mine (who is a car seat technician through our local Early Years Centre) discouraged me. The convertable seat has a different angle and it can hold their necks/heads improperly and they could actually slump forward too far and that could be very dangerous for their ability to breath properly. The infant seat reclines further (when installed properly).

  7. Chris says:

    I agree using the right size diaper will save money, however, I have put all three of babies in a size larger diaper for sleeping and they sleep through the night at two months. This was well worth the cost for us!

  8. Elizabeth says:

    Don’t stock up too much on diapers expecting your child to be able to wear the smaller sizes for a long time to save money! Once the poop blowouts up the back start, you need to move up to a larger size! You don’t want to be left with a huge stockpile of small diapers that you won’t be able to use! If you’re stocking up, by a reasonable number in each size, and fill in from there.

  9. Sara says:

    BREATSFEEDING! Not just saving money its FREE!

  10. Grant says:

    Breastfeeding may be cheaper than fomula but I wouldn’t say it is free. You still need to buy a decent pump, storage bags, nursing bras, nipple shields, lanolin cream, leaking pads and a few bottles. I breastfed all three of my children for at least a year each but some people cannot breastfeed so that’s not a frugal way to go for them. I’m personally glad I bought most things new because three children later, I’ve got a lot of use out of it all, including my two nursing pillows and sleep in the bed thingy.

    I quite often stockpile diapers and if I’ve got too many left over in one size, I simply asking if I can exchange them for the right size and it’s never been a problem – just keep your receipts!

  11. Sara says:

    Those are all one time purchases as well as things u can request at your shower, as well none of those things are neccessities. I breastfed my daughter with none of those things. You can use your milk as nipple cream.

  12. Katie says:

    Definitely not buying into the hype of everything out there. These stores have huge marketing departments aimed at mothers to be, expecting mothers and those who’ve already popped a bundle of joy out!

    As far as babyshower gifts go, I’ve always picked up clothing and a gift card for the new parents for a ‘date night’ (restaurants, or movie theatres…). I find as far as most other things go, I don’t have the money for it, or they have it locked down themselves….

Leave a Comment

(required)

This post may contain affiliate links. Read our disclosure policy (here).